Posted by: Kingsguru21 | September 4, 2009

Sergio Rodriguez: The man, the myth, and the legend

It seems to me that all summer long, and despite optimistic early expectation that Rodriguez might net something valuable, the reality of Sergio Rodriguez is that he won’t have much of a future with the Kings.

Why? Just a hunch. But, if you want to read what the hunch is based on, read on.

If you’ve read the title (all 3000 words of it), than you’ve probably figured out that there is 3 parts to this deal with Sergio.

The first part is the Spanish ACB Sergio. In his last season, at 19/20 years old, he averaged 9.2 pts, on 44% overall shooting, 49% from 2 point land, and 28% from 3. What does that tell me? He can’t shoot deep. (It also tells me he probably got a lot of layup’s.) He also shot anywhere from 63 to 72% from the FT line as well. (These are not good percentages for a G.)

He also averaged 4.9 assists and 2.1 rebounds, too.

What does that mean? Absolutely nothing to me. It means that’s he’s probably best in an up-tempo system (which I could have told you without knowing anything based on his time in the ACB). The question: Does he fit that?

I’m not sure if his ACB days qualify him being a man, myth, or legend. Frankly, I don’t think I care.

******

When Rodriguez was taken 27th in the 2006 draft he was considered to have some upside, but Portland thought it would take him some time. He never developed as much as Jarrett Jack did, and the Blazers moved Jack for the rights to Jerryd Bayless (along with the rights to Brandon Rush) on 2008 draft day. That was the tell-tale sign that Portland wanted to give Rodriguez a chance.

What happened? He was generally unhappy he couldn’t get more minutes playing for Nate McMillan in an up-tempo system. I get that part. Here’s what I don’t get: How would the Kings utilize him effectively if they don’t employ an up-tempo system?

Rodriguez’s time where is where the myth & legend come into play.

******

If you talk to a sect of Blazer fans who generally think on an even keel, they’ll tell you Rodriguez has talent. What they will also tell you is that Rodriguez’s talents have to be utilized in a system appropriately, and beyond that, good luck. Rodriguez isn’t a very good defender, he’s short, and he’s not a deep shooter.

Exactly what does that mean? Up-tempo, Up-tempo, Up-tempo. Anything else? Hell to the fuck no.

******

At this point, what I do know is that Rodriguez won’t likely be around very long. He has a contract for a million & half dollars (or so), and has one year left on the deal before it expires. The Kings got cash (I’ve heard some say it was 1.5 million, but I heavily doubt it until someone like Sam Amick says otherwise) for Rodriguez (they used a trade exception to acquire Rodriguez which was created from the Ron Artest deal in 2008), and swapped their 2nd round pick with one of Portland’s at 38. (Sacramento had the first pick of the 2nd round at 31st overall.) What does that mean? It means to me that Rodriguez was about getting free cash from Portland to take his salary for a season. (Portland was trying to free up more cap space for the upcoming Free Agency smash.)

What does getting free cash mean? Well, let’s assume the Kings got 3 million (which is the most amount of cash any team can send in a transaction) out of the Rodriguez deal. That would mean they got to pay Rodriguez’s salary this season, along with Omri Casspi and his buyout. (Or at the very least the 500 K they would pay toward’s Casspi’s buyout.)

That’s 2 roster spots paid for by taking on a 1 year salary. For a team that is supposedly losing cash, and whether they are not I do not know, that means Rodriguez was about money.

What does that mean to me? Absolutely nothing. What does that mean to the Maloof’s and the cash they’re putting up? It means that perhaps they are looking to diminish the amount of monetary risk this team currently has. (Plus it may help their chances to turn a profit this season.)

*******

In short, I don’t think there is anything particularly great about Sergio Rodriguez, and, honestly, I don’t expect to see much this season. He might get 15 mins a game here & there due to injuries. With Beno Udrih signed long term, however, and with Tyreke Evans more than likely ahead of Rodriguez already on the depth chart, it’s going to be difficult for Sergio to get out of that shadow.

Which leads to 2 possibilities. The first is that the Kings keep him all year in case of a bad injury to Udrih, and what not, and let the year play out. Then, next summer they let him walk and probably won’t even offer him a Qualifying Offer in similar fashion to Ike Diogu. (By not offering a potential restricted Free Agent a QO, it effectively allows that player to become unrestricted in Free Agency.)

The second is they trade him in a package that could include a player like Nocioni to the Knicks for something worthwhile in return. (What I do not know.) Andres Nocioni and Sergio Rodriguez for somebody like Jared Jeffries and Wilson Chandler, or something like that.

I think it’s more likely that if the Kings do trade anybody, it will be Nocioni. For every reason available, saving money has become a major priority in Kings land, and dumping a year of Nocioni’s salary will mean that the Kings absolutely shave off more potential salary long term off the Brad Miller/John Salmons salary dump. There will be fans who will want more than that for Nocioni, but no team will be willing to commit 2 years and 13.5 mill to Nocioni for an expiring contract and a 1st round pick. NBA teams are competitive, and that’s a surefire way to diminish your capacity for being as competitive as possible. Nocioni isn’t just that type of value. Ron Artest got a low 1st round pick in return. Is Andres Nocioni as good as Ron Artest? No. Point made.

So, I think Rodriguez will be 2nd or 3rd string PG all year long until he’s let go. That’s the official educated guess.

Advertisements

Responses

  1. […] that’s that. Like Sergio Rodriguez, he can do something specific, and that is board well in limited minutes. Which is one thing the […]


Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: